Professors Take Heed… Teachers Should Too

disconnect.jpg

Another great example I found on the web via the Dangerously Irrelevant blog, in this post. It’s a short video by  Consuelo Molina, UCLA student, videographer, and graduate of the San Fernando Education Technology Team (SFETT), called Digital Kids @ Analog Schools. Consuelo is but one of an increasing number of young people who really get it when it comes to using technology for learning, work, and life.

The content of the video is centered around the idea that colleges and universities are not preparing students for the world beyond because pedagogies are backward instead of forward looking. According to the video, what students want:

  • more than just lectures, papers, and problem sets; no more teaching with yesterday’s tools
  • to be able to connect with what they learn
  • choices in the way they can express themselves, e.g. having control over how they represent what they’ve learned. The phrase “visual learner” comes up over and over again
  • access to technology to personalize learning
  • to be prepared for the jobs that our available NOW, jobs that require creativity, intellectual capital, communication skills, coming up with ideas
  • to get value for their tuition
  • to apply technology to learning
  • for professors and instructors to listen to them
  • colleges to break the norm, be different, and start looking to the future

Pay attention to the ending as well, it’s very cleverly done. However, as discussed in the video, a picture (or in this case a video) is worth a thousand words. If you like what you read here, watch the video, and you’ll really get the message.

Finally, this quote from the video sums up the feelings of more and more students these days, at all levels of education:

If this place isn’t perfecting my skills for the new business world, then why am I here?

Image credit: serafini:
http://flickr.com/photos/serafa/67922566/

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One response to “Professors Take Heed… Teachers Should Too

  1. Pingback: Digital Storytelling « Ubiquitous Thoughts

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