Daily Archives: November 10, 2008

Carnival of the Mobilists #149: A Quiet Fall Festival

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This week’s Carnival is a fairly quiet one, as there were fewer submissions than usual (but then, quality is more important than quantity…). In addition, the US Presidential Elections are over (finally!), as Barack Obama posted a decisive win by sweeping most of the swing states, including mine, Ohio. Moreover, it was a quiet week for me, as I’ve finally gotten back into my normal routine following back-to-back trips to England for Handheld Learning 2008 (for great round-ups of posts, videos, and presentations, see here and here) and Taiwan for the APEC Cyber Academy Conference.

Let’s take a look at this week’s contributions. Money and the economy seem to be the main theme here.

The folks at the mjelly blog list 7 reasons why the mobile internet and mobile 2.0 can survive the credit crunch; definitely a timely post!

Andreas Constantinou at Vision Mobile points out that “Mobile software is critical to the function of both the handset itself and the mobile industry as a whole. But the revenue potential of mobile software is changing in a very symmetrical way: it’s migrating from embedded pre-load software, to downloadable, post-sales software.” Make sure to catch the comment section at the end of this post as well.

M. Raddedas sent a post on iSkoot’s investment to build an applications platform for AT&T – “it’s a little cynical but I think a cash injection of that size for those aims in this financial climate deserves a little cynicism :)” Hop on over to the Techype blog, which provides a “cynical insider view of the mobile industry, sorting the wheat from the considerable chaff in one of the most overhyped tech sectors of today using a blog – the favoured communications tool of the other most hyped technology of today. Expect no mercy, but we will be nice when it’s deserved and constructive in our criticism.” (just had to add this tagline 😉 ).

Dennis Bournique at WAP Review contributed an extensive review of another event, the 2008 Mobile 2.0 event in San Francisco. It looks like it was a great event. Unfortunately the links to Part 2 of this review did not work, so Dennis, if you read this post, please fix them, I’m sure Carnival readers (myself included) would love to see what else you wrote about Mobile 2.0.  [update: the links to part 2 now work. Thanks for fixing them!!]

Ajit Jaokar from the Open Gardens blog makes the argument that it is much more important for telecoms to know their customers than owning them and that three things are needed to do so.

Dean Bubley submitted not one but two posts. The first one is entitled Mobile broadband – O2 highlights dissatisfaction and returns management, discussing O2’s recent struggles with its mobile broadband offerings. Dean’s other post, “Redefining “Telco Grade” for the Mobile Internet era“, has him “wondering whether concepts, which are heavily rooted in a world where telecoms was all about voice sessions and dialtone, are in need of a serious update.”

Finally, from the world of education and learning, with some election coverage thrown in for good measure are the following posts: 

Judy Breck proposes in her contribution that the future smartphone arena for learning is the Internet. I would definitely agree with her on that one (and this is my pick for post of the week), as learning while mobile seems to depend increasingly on the convergence of mobile, wireless, and connectivity. A case in point would be the recent Presidential Elections, as discussed in various posts on the SmartMob blog, including a “Smart Guide to the U.S. Elections” by Mark Kramer and Judy Breck’s analysis “Why this Presidential election is historic” In fact, it seems that public participation in the government (post-election) is increasingly facilitated by web-based (and mobile) technologies, as is discussed in “User generated dialog with the President-Elect.

And there you have it, another Carnival for the books. Next week’s Carnival is hosted by Mippin Blog. For details on the Carnival, how to contribute, and how to become a host, please visit the Carnival of the Mobilists website. As usual, please send your contributions to mobilists@gmail.com