Category Archives: blacksburg

Inquire, Learn, Reflect

hillelmemorial.jpg                             alison-krause.jpg

And so our “May 4 remembrance begins” … That’s the title of the article in yesterday’s Kent Stater. Early May is always kind of an interesting time of year at Kent State University. It’s the end of the semester, and the weather is usually nice. However, it’s also a time of reflection because of the May 4 Remembrance.

For those of you who may not know, on May 4, 1970, four students were shot and killed, and nine others wounded by the National Guard during a protest about the Vietnam War. To this day, there is no clarity on what exactly happened and if an order to fire was ever given, and it is still a subject of great controversy 37 years after it happened. This year that’s even more the case, given the recent news coverage about the release of an audio tape that supposedly proves that an order to fire was actually given.

The best-known artifact of the May 4 shootings is probably this picture:

kent_state_massacre.jpg

 I was almost 2 years old when the shootings took place and living in the Netherlands, where I learned about the events of this fateful day from my World History classes in high school. I vividly remember seeing this image in my history book.

This year the remembrance will be even more somber, as not only the Kent State shootings will be remembered, but also the recent events at Virginia Tech, and there will be a display of boots to visually represent the losses in Iraq.

Our University will be closed at noon for the remembrance events. I will be in the Commons. Speakers this year include Tom Hayden, Cindy Sheehan, and US Representative for the 17th district Tim Ryan.

 For more in depth information about the events of May 4, 1970, there are plenty of Internet resources. Here are a few of the good ones (see, there is some technology in this post after all):

Wikipedia entry on May 4, 1970

May 4 collection at the Kent State Libraries

Kent State’s May 4 Taskforce

Image Credits:

“Hillel Memorial” and “Allison Krause” by myself (May 4, 2007).

Wikipedia: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/65/Kent_State_massacre.jpg (the original image was taken by John Filo, who won the 1971 Pulitzer Prize for this image)

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4-16-2007 continued

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Just a couple of additional sources that shed additional light on the role of new media sources in the coverage of major news events, and the ways in which news reporting is changing. Paul Bradshaw writes in a short but interesting post in his Online Journalism Blog that

Unlike previous user generated content milestones like 9/11 and the Asian tsunami, this story took place in the heart of the new media generation, and the resulting coverage is more comprehensive, more accessible, and takes in more new media forms, including social networking.

Via this same blog, I came across this post on Poynter Online, which provides an interesting collection of “user-generated content” of the Virginia Tech tragedy, from a journalistic point of view. Lots of interesting stuff; and like Bradshaw says in his post, roles are changing:

1) the need to develop the awareness of, and skills to find, this material; 2) in the face of such comprehensive and accessible first-person reporting, the need to develop new roles, perhaps as gatewatchers, facilitators and filters rather than reporters.

And by the way, this doesn’t hold true just for journalists ….

Image credit: “One Day Blog Silence”, David Leggett’s photostream:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/theleggett/463068884/

4-16-2007

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What happened yesterday at Virginia Tech University is awful beyond belief, and I’m sure the event will be analyzed out the wazoo by the U.S. and global news media. When I started to follow the story (not really until sometime last night), I started drawing parallels to a similar event that happened at the University of Iowa on November 1, 1991. I lived mere blocks from where that shooting happened and was home at the time of the event.

In 1991, we learned about the event from the local television stations, and a more in-depth write-up appeared in a special edition of the university’s newspaper the next morning. Compared to the deluge of information that will come from the Virginia Tech campus and beyond within the next weeks, the amount of information released immediately following the 1991 shooting was fairly small (even the wikipedia entry for the Virginia Tech shootings is already larger than the one for the University of Iowa shooting).

Anyway, I won’t dwell on the facts too much here, as plenty has already been written and will be written by the major news outlets such as CNN and MSNBC. However, what is interesting is that had this event taken place before the advent of the Internet like the shooting in Iowa City, my information sources (and therefore my take on the tragic events as they unfolded in Blacksburg) would have been very different. I didn’t really watch TV news channels yesterday. In fact, I picked up on the story via a few different blogs in my Feedreader. After a cursory look at the headlines on MSNBC, I got quite a bit of information (and links to a variety of other sources) from this post on Boing Boing, which led me to images on flickr here and here. I also found some videos on YouTube. In addition, quite a bit had already been written in the edublogger community by the likes of Anne Davis, Vicki Davis, Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach, and Wes Fryer.

What struck me is that pretty much everybody who mentioned the event mentioned the wikipedia entry. Wes made an interesting observation:

From an information literacy perspective, following the comments on the history page of the WikiPedia entry for this incident is illuminating. What are the authors discussing and commenting on?
– What is the reference for that?
– Are included details and links relevant to this situation?
– Is accurate language being used, or are unwarranted exaggerations being made?

These types of discussions about information posted online and its accuracy are extremely important skills for our students to master, as it is easy to just believe what’s posted online because it is online. There’s an obvious danger in this kind of blind faith, and it surfaces even in tragic situations like this one, as this follow-up story from Boing Boing shows. An excerpt:

Blogs and online discussions yesterday misidentified 23-year-old Wayne Chiang (above), a VA Tech student with a penchant for guns, South Park, and bummed-out blog entries, as the shooter responsible for the VA Tech massacre.

Mr. Chiang’s “wanusmaximus” livejournal (“Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.”) and Facebook profile include many photos of heavy weapons, and vanity shots of him posing with quantities of those weapons.

Mr. Chiang is Asian-American, and early reports indicate the VA Tech shooter was, too — which added to many internet accusers’ certainty that he was the killer, even though investigators still have not disclosed the name of the actual VA Tech murderer.

Comment fields on Chiang’s site soon filled with racist lines like “so u are the asisan that shot up the school. i hate u and your people.”

But, news alert: lots of LJs look like Chiang’s. Gloomy web poetry and a gun hobby don’t prove a dude is a mass murderer. After dozens of “j’accuse!” blog posts linked to his journal like so many pointed fingers, Chiang finally posted an update late last night:

Coming out. I am not the shooter. Through this experience, I have received numerous death threats, slanderous accusations, and my phone is out of charge from the barrage of calls. Local police have been notified of the situation.

As I’ve discussed before on this blog, the nature of news production and consumption is changing (see e.g. this post on SmartMobs), and major news events such as the tragedy at Virginia Tech are prime examples. What it means for education is that we need to seriously rethink how we teach our children to examine news, showing them the importance of not only accessing information, but carefully analyzing it, juxtaposing different points of view, and trying to construct the most accurate and comprehensive story from a large number of very different sources.

As for all of you at VT who have been affected by the shootings, know that my prayers are with you…

Image Credit: “Prayers for Virginia Tech”, from busiguy6’s photstream:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/busiguy6/461741757/in/pool-va-tech-shooting/